Last Book Syndrome: ‘Maybe Someday’ by Colleen Hoover

by Clarissa Chua “Maybe someday.” It’s a phrase that holds so much promise and uncertainty. Something to look forward to, something to dread. And as we’re moving through life, we’re always filled with Maybe Somedays. Maybe Somedays that we call dreams, wishes, goals, life pegs, aspirations or even our bucket list. And I adore this phrase so much because it holds in its two tiny words hope for the future. Like what these two words represent, Maybe Someday exemplifies. Colleen Hoover magnificently toyed with our emotions—as much as I hate to say it—making it course to the high and plunge deep to…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘The Lies About Truth’ by Courtney C. Stevens

by Clarissa Chua Happy New Year, Cheer Readers! Welcome to the first Last Book Syndrome of 2016. We seem to have an innate attachment to continuity, so much that it makes leaving hard and forgetting tough. It is evident in the ideologies of our society—nation, the invisible ties we deem to have with those from the same place, even religion, promising continuity after death. We try so hard to protect the past and keep it with us that we celebrate this and mourn our separation. This mindset is evident in The Lies About Truth by Courtney C. Stevens, where Sadie, Gray and Gina are…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Calculus’ by Ron Larson and Bruce Edwards

by Clarissa Chua I haven’t read a book for almost three weeks now. That is unless you count my Calculus book by Ron Larson and Bruce Edwards… Okay, maybe I’ll count that as one and that is why we’re here! And while this might just be one of the nerdiest posts, if not the most, you’ll ever read here, don’t let this intimidate you. Because I’m delighted to report that we’re not going to take about lessons on numbers here, but lessons practical to our everyday lives. 1. Sometimes, explanations are not enough. You just have to show it. For a book about numbers,…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Forget Me Not’ by Allison Whitmore

by Clarissa Chua When historical fiction is fused with the classic Romeo and Juliet star-crossed romance, you get Forget Me Not by Allison Whitmore. The story portrays love and the journey for the truth in engrossing and lovable characters. The book is written in the third person POV, which is uncommon in love stories but can reveal insights to the deepest thoughts of the characters and provide a new paradigm for the readers. To give you a glimpse of what it’s about, here’s the synopsis: Theodora “Teddi” Donovan and Calvin Wynne have always hated each other. They didn’t have a choice after…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Heaven’s Forgotten’ by Branden Johnson

by Clarissa Chua THE STORY Moira just wants a normal life for her daughter, Penelope. And sometimes, it seems like she has achieved it. Penelope is a sweet, smart, and precocious four-year-old girl. However, she is also the product of Moira’s affair with an angel. Her parentage gives Penelope strength far beyond what any child should possess. It also makes her the target of fallen angels who intend to use her mysterious powers as their way back into Heaven. Worse yet, one of those fallen angels is her own father. Now, Moira finds herself caught up in a terrifying struggle for…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Something about Love’ by Elana Johnson

by Clarissa Chua The increased productivity of people tend to neglect the most essential and simple things in life—nature, reading books and the simple act of relaxing, spending quality time with their loved ones. Yet, ironically, they (we) still crave for the beauty in haste. Reading Elana Johnson reminds me it isn’t impossible to feel both. Something about Love by Elana Johnson gives us the taste of the typical YA story that we love into the restricted structure of a poem. It is something new—at least, to me—and easy and refreshing to read even when bombarded by a myriad of deadlines and workload….

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Love & Misadventure’ by Lang Leav

by Clarissa Chua If you need to properly articulate a thought, Lang Leav is your go-to person. She connects words to meanings so beautifully it feels like no one has ever done so before. Though her book of poems may be a bit heavy for the wallet, I guarantee it will be worth it. Lang Leav is just ♥. Now, I’ll let the words do the talking. The first one is from “Angels,” my favorite one from the book. It tells of how we cross each other’s paths, thinking we’ve found home in them but instead, things turn out differently. The…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe’ by Benjamin Alire Saez

by Clarissa Chua I got Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saez in exchange for Anna Karenina that my friend gave me. (Thank you, Lord, for gift receipts!) It was a spontaneous choice because I originally wanted Lang Leav’s books but when my mom saw it, her eyes grew wide at the thinness of the books. But thinking back (three months ago, by the way), what compelled me to pick the book was its cover. Who ever said anything about not judging a book by its cover? Also, the choice of philosopher names for a…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Divergent’ by Veronica Roth

by Clarissa Chua Divergent by Veronica Roth is definitely not the last book I’ve read. In all honesty, if I get the book nearest to me and turn it to page 70, it’ll say that my life’s assets is tantamount to my liabilities and equity. *gasp* And you wouldn’t want a quote on that, trust me. This quote is in celebration of the birthday of one of my favorite contemporary dystopian authors, Veronica Roth! (Yes, I love classic dystopian novels like 1984 by George Orwell and The Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry. But I didn’t even realize that they were under the…