6 Things To Love About Japanese Bookstores

by Clarissa Chua Last year, we visited bookish destinations in Hong Kong. This time, let’s discover the awesome things about Japanese bookstores! 1. Nine floors of books, books and more books One of Japan’s biggest chain of bookstores, Books Kinokuniya, has a branch in Shinjuku, home to over nine floors of books. Each floor houses its own specialty, such as design and crafts, sciences or even just CDs and DVDs. Tourists and visitors surely do not feel left out when visiting the bookstore because they have the entire sixth floor solely dedicated to foreign books! 2. Secondhand bookstores There are also mini-bookstores all over…

6 Discoveries About Inflight Reading

by Clarissa Chua I have never been a fan of airplanes. (Well, except for the time when they gave out free things like coloring books and crayons, but I was too young to actually remember that.) Imagine my dread when I was faced with a four-hour flight. Yes, it may not be that bad yet, but can you blame me? Clue: No. The answer is no. HAHA. Fortunately, I was able to keep myself occupied and here are the six little things I appreciated about my air journey with a book. 1. Pick the right book It is a long flight….

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Maybe Someday’ by Colleen Hoover

by Clarissa Chua “Maybe someday.” It’s a phrase that holds so much promise and uncertainty. Something to look forward to, something to dread. And as we’re moving through life, we’re always filled with Maybe Somedays. Maybe Somedays that we call dreams, wishes, goals, life pegs, aspirations or even our bucket list. And I adore this phrase so much because it holds in its two tiny words hope for the future. Like what these two words represent, Maybe Someday exemplifies. Colleen Hoover magnificently toyed with our emotions—as much as I hate to say it—making it course to the high and plunge deep to…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘The Lies About Truth’ by Courtney C. Stevens

by Clarissa Chua Happy New Year, Cheer Readers! Welcome to the first Last Book Syndrome of 2016. We seem to have an innate attachment to continuity, so much that it makes leaving hard and forgetting tough. It is evident in the ideologies of our society—nation, the invisible ties we deem to have with those from the same place, even religion, promising continuity after death. We try so hard to protect the past and keep it with us that we celebrate this and mourn our separation. This mindset is evident in The Lies About Truth by Courtney C. Stevens, where Sadie, Gray and Gina are…

Bookbed reviews: ‘The X Factor: Confessions of a Naïve Fashion Model’ by Ivan Sivec

by Clarissa Chua THE STORY It takes three mistakes to be swallowed up and spat out by the fashion industry. You trust the wrong people. You think you know everything there is to know about life. You take drugs. Maja started off as a regular 17-year-old high-school kid, fighting her inner insecurities while dreaming to become an actress like Marilyn Monroe. At a party her boyfriend Klemen introduces her to a renowned modelling agent. He sees a special X Factor hidden insight her. And a great business opportunity for himself… Fast forward a few weeks later. Maja’s charm and talent land…

Last Book Syndrome: ‘Calculus’ by Ron Larson and Bruce Edwards

by Clarissa Chua I haven’t read a book for almost three weeks now. That is unless you count my Calculus book by Ron Larson and Bruce Edwards… Okay, maybe I’ll count that as one and that is why we’re here! And while this might just be one of the nerdiest posts, if not the most, you’ll ever read here, don’t let this intimidate you. Because I’m delighted to report that we’re not going to take about lessons on numbers here, but lessons practical to our everyday lives. 1. Sometimes, explanations are not enough. You just have to show it. For a book about numbers,…