Bookbed recommends: 8 Japanese Novels To Read

by Erica In celebration of Bookbed’s eighth year, let me share to you my Top 8  Japanese Books Recommendations as of July 2018. (Note: I’ve already read these babies a couple of times!) 1. The Tale of Genji (源氏物語, Genji Monogatari) by Murasaki Shikibu Considered as the first novel to be written in history by Murasaki Shikibu, The Tale of Genji is a Japanese classic. This is the abridged edition that I read in 2014. I also have the longer edition (more than 1000 pages. ) which I haven’t read yet (one of these days, for sure). 2. The Setting Sun (斜陽, Shayō) by Osamu Dazai This novel…

6 Things To Love About Japanese Bookstores

by Clarissa Chua Last year, we visited bookish destinations in Hong Kong. This time, let’s discover the awesome things about Japanese bookstores! 1. Nine floors of books, books and more books One of Japan’s biggest chain of bookstores, Books Kinokuniya, has a branch in Shinjuku, home to over nine floors of books. Each floor houses its own specialty, such as design and crafts, sciences or even just CDs and DVDs. Tourists and visitors surely do not feel left out when visiting the bookstore because they have the entire sixth floor solely dedicated to foreign books! 2. Secondhand bookstores There are also mini-bookstores all over…

From Osaka to Nagoya: Bookish Things in Japan

by KB Meniado For bookish people, it’s a must to check out bookstores when travelling. The mere sight of reading materials—not to mention, the company of fellow story lovers, browsing through shelves after shelves after shelves—is exciting. Anything even remotely bookish is already a feast to the eyes. Sometimes, it can even get to a point where the visit to the bookstore becomes the highlight of the trip (nerd alert!). Now, I’m not saying the rest of Japan isn’t as magical but why, the bookstores I dropped by at had me all tingly. Osaka — Tsutaya Bookstore Osaka — Wizarding World of Harry…

Fiction Nation: Spellbound

by Allana Luta One of my favorite fictional adventures involve a hatter, a wizard and a moving castle. Any guesses? For those unfamiliar with this movie (I doubt there are many of you), Howl’s Moving Castle is a Japanese animated film released in 2004 by Studio Ghibli. The story revolves around Sophie, a young girl who, in the beginning, works as a hatter in her mother’s shop. By an (un)fortunate circumstance, Sophie is transformed into a 90-year-old woman by a witch. As she searches for a cure to break the spell, Sophie finds herself working as a cleaning lady for the…

Bookbed recommends: ‘Totto-chan: The Little Girl at the Window’ by Tetsuko Kuroyanagi

by Oryo It has been ages since I wrote any thoughts about a book. The last I can remember was when our Biology professor required us to write an extensive book report about an Ebola-inspired book, The Hot Zone by Richard Preston, which, by the way, I recommend. I can tell you, though, that my thoughts and feelings back then were generally compulsory. Of course that’s a thing of the past, about a decade ago to be exact. While books remain a staple in my daily existence, ironically, I just read when I am not too lazy or when I need a breath of…

Bookbed goes to: Kumazawa Bookstore

by KB Meniado I was in Tokyo last month and one of the places I loved visiting the most was this bookstore! I think you’ll know why. The Rurouni Kenshin films were in cinemas back then so it was imperative these existed: I am not the biggest Samurai X fan but I AM DEFINITELY A MOON CRYSTAL POWER MAKEUP GIRL. Why are these not available worldwide again? Speaking of global, I’m sure most of you can relate with the Naruto and Doraemon. The Detective Conan series was also on-hand. Local books were not to be missed, either. All the covers are beautiful, it’s a shame I’m…