Ink Blots: 6 Poems For Children and Adults To Enjoy

by Kariza Montealegre Exposing children to poetry is important since it allows them to appreciate words better at an early age. From rhymes and sound emphasis to wordplay, reading poetry is not just a fun activity with kids; it could also be instrumental in forming a foundation for their reading. Wondering which poems are best for the little ones? There are definitely a ton of amazing ones available, but in celebration of National Children’s Book Day (#NCBD2016!) and, of course, Bookbed’s sixth birthday, allow me to share with you my top six poems for children (in no particular order). 1. “Maggie…

Bookbed turns 6: 6 Reasons To Enjoy Writing About Reading

We turn six this year, and to celebrate, we came up with six things on why we do what we do here on Bookbed. We hope these encourage you to write about books and reading as well. Enjoy! 1. We write about reading to understand. “Writing about reading helps generate discourse and facilitate understanding.” —WINA PUANGCO of Crossed Wires 2. We write about reading to share our passion. “Writing about reading allows you to share your passion, your reading experience or how a literary piece has affected you, among others. In the process of writing about reading, you gain a better understanding of your own reading…

Challenging Creativity: An Interview with Artist Elyoo dela Cruz

by Karz Montealegre In June 2015, artist Elyoo dela Cruz posted on Instagram a portrait she painted of Frida Kahlo. Perfectly capturing Kahlo’s prominent features, it was a vibrant take on the Mexican painter’s portrait that could easily pass as a character from a storybook. View this post on Instagram 1/100: Frida Kahlo. In an attempt to (force myself to) practice using gouache, I'm doing portraits for my #the100dayproject #illustration A post shared by elyoo (@elyoodelacroix) on Jun 1, 2015 at 5:01am PDT It wasn’t the first artwork Elyoo shared online, but it was the first of a hundred—a start to…

Ink Blots: ‘Shrinking Women’ by Lily Myers

by Kariza Montealegre Each day is a fight for women’s rights, and each day is a chance to honor women and their contributions to society, so today, I’ll be sharing a spoken word poem I stumbled upon years ago and has stuck with me since. As a woman, it is easy to feel inferior. You doubt your body. You doubt your opinions. You doubt yourself. Body image and self image issues are not exclusive to women, but it can be said that these are two of the many challenges most girls struggle with at a young age. It’s like your anatomy has…

Ink Blots: ‘Questions of Travel’ by Elizabeth Bishop

by Kariza Montealegre Welcome to the first Ink Blots post of 2016. I’m sure a lot of you have made a list of sights you want to see, adventures you want to embark in and places you want to discover. I can’t blame you if you have that burning desire to leave home (I am guilty of that, too), but have you ever thought of why? Why the itch? Today’s poem is “Questions of Travel” by Elizabeth Bishop. Written by the award-winning American poet after years of living in Brazil, the piece was first published in 1965 in a collection…

Ink Blots: ‘The Invitation’ by Oriah

by Kariza Montealegre It’s been a while since the last Ink Blots, but I hope you’re all good, making the most of the remaining days of the year. (Can you believe 2015 is almost over?) Whatever you may be up to these days, allow me to drizzle you with some inspiration today. Today’s piece is about the joy in accepting one’s true self and finding the beauty of life. First shared in 1994, The Invitation by Oriah was published in the book of the same title in 1999. Often shared through word of mouth, quoted in the web and recited in…

Ink Blots: ‘Mad Girl’s Love Song’ by Sylvia Plath

by Kariza Montealegre Last time, I wrote about a piece in line with Mental Health Day. Today, I’m sharing a poem on madness from a poet who suffered from bipolar disorder and depression and eventually committed suicide—Sylvia Plath. It’s also the birth anniversary of this literary genius this month, so it seems like the perfect time to revisit one of her works. Plath, who started writing poems at eight years old, was categorized as a confessional poet. Confessional poetry is the personal kind. Centered on the details of the writer’s psyche and experience, it touches on matters like mental illness and sexuality….